Michael Gerson on Christian Nationalism

Here.

Quote:

…. America is not a Christian country and has never been, for historical, theological and philosophic reasons.

First, the Constitution was designed for religious diversity because the Founders were religiously diverse. The 18th century was a time not of quiet piety but of religious controversy. It was a high tide of American Unitarianism, a direct challenge to Christian orthodoxy. Thomas Jefferson’s deism flirted with atheism — a God so distant that He didn’t even require his own existence. As journalist Jon Meacham points out, the Founders were less orthodox than the generation that preceded them, as well as the one that followed them. Their commitment to disestablishment, in some cases, accommodated their own heterodoxy.

Second, American religious communities were often strong supporters of disestablishment. Dissenting Protestants had a long history of resentment for the established English church. Others — Catholics and Quakers — were minorities suspicious of majority religious rule. Christians generally saw state intrusion as a threat to their theological integrity and worldly power as a diversion from their mission. They supported disestablishment for the sake of the church. And their political independence contributed to their religious vitality.

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One Response to Michael Gerson on Christian Nationalism

  1. ppnl says:

    I have always felt that one thing driving the desire to break down the separation of church and state is the homogenization of religion in America. In the 18th century they feared and distrusted each other. This made it almost necessary to separate church and state on the federal level and made it possible to repeat the principle in the state constitutions. After the civil war it began to look necessary in the states.

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